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Publication THE OCCURRENCE OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE IN TAIWAN FROM 1970 TO 1985  

Update Date: [2013-11-05]

NO.: 23
 
Reportno.

AHRI report No.23

Topic

THE OCCURRENCE OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE IN TAIWAN FROM 1970 TO 1985

Department

Taiwan Animal Health Research Institute

Author Y.S. Lu; HJ. Tsai; D.F. Un; Y.LLee; MJ.Kwang; S.Y. Yang; S.H. lie; Author C Lee; S.T. Huang
Summary

During the rericd from 1970 through 1983, total of 369 Newcastle diseases (ND) cases were diagncserl from the avian cases submiti to the Taiwan Provincial Research Institute for Animal Health in Taiwan. Mast of the ND cases diagnaserl were of chicken (93.22%, 344B69), and following by of pigeon (l3cases), Pheasant (4 cases), gcxse (3 cases), turkey (2 cases), quail (1 case), dympy (1 case), and cxx4 (1 case).

Among 344 of chicken, it was found that all type of chicken (br3er, boiler, layer, hybrid, native) and all age groups (1 to 40 week-ok)) were induchi, However, mast of the chicken flcdrs affectl (81.65%) was under two months old.

ND viruses were isolati more fruently from lung, trachea, brain intestine, and Summary spleen. The incidence of gross lesion was found higher in the proventriculus, snail intestine, trachea, heart ceacal tonsil, lung, and girard. According to the clinical signs and grass lesions ohserverl, it is bulieved that both velogenic viscerotropic Newcastle disease (WND) and velogenic neuxoiropic Newcastle disease (VNND) were exis1 in Taiwan; however, WND is more prevalent.

An epidemic Newcastle disease of pigeon (avian paramovirus type 1 infation) occurred in Taiwan during 1984 through 1985. The infotive pigeon showed the clinical sign of diarrhea, convulsion, and paralysis. Grass lesions were limitti to enteritis, but histoethological examination revealed the mononuclear cells infiltration in cereh-uin and brain, kidney and liver. Five stains of ND virus were isolated from pigeons during the epidemic.

Keyword

VNND; Newcastle Disease; velogenicviscerotropic