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Seminar 826  
Date:2013-06-19
Update:2014-08-12

 

Seminar:  826

1

Speaker(s)

Yu-Ju Lin

Topic

Production of Monoclonal Antibodies against Duck Hepatitis Virus

Abstract

Duck virus hepatitis (DVH) is a highly fatal and contagious viral disease of young ducklings less than 6 weeks old with hepatitis as the characterized lesion. The duck hepatitis viruses have been classified to DHAV-1, DHAV-2, DHAV-3, DHV-II and DHV-III, etc. In Taiwan, DHAV-1 is the dominant virus. A traditional time-consuming virus neutralization test has been conducted for DVH antibody surveillance. Viral protein 1 (VP1) of DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies in infected ducks. In this study, the recombinant VP1 (rVP1) was expressed with E.coli /baculovirus expression system and antigenicity of rVP1 was confirmed with hyper-immune serum by western blotting. The purified rVP1 was used to immunize mice. Several monoclonal antibodies have been generated. In the future, we will develop serum neutralization test and analyze the interaction between VP1 and mAb to elucidate the antigenicity of antigen epitopes.

2

Speaker(s)

Chen-Shen Huang

Topic

Genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis from ruminants in Taiwan in 2012

Abstract

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic bacterial disease of animals and humans caused by Mycobacterium bovis. In this study, we used Spoligotyping and MIRU/VNTR which both were common genotyping methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to analyze 47 M. bovis isolates from ruminants in Taiwan in 2012. Eight types were identified. SB0265-I was the largest population (63.8%, 30/47) and distributed all areas in this study. And the other 7 types concentrated in few farms. Presently, how these farms were infected was still known. We need more epidemiologic researches with local epidemic prevention staff to clear the reasons of M. bovis infection.

3

Speaker(s)

Yen-Ping Chen

Topic

Goslings Early Vaccinated against Waterfowl Parvovirus and the Report of Participation in the "International Basic Veterinary Epidemiology Training Course" in the United States

Abstract

Waterfowl parvovirus infection is a disease which goslings and ducklings infected goose parvovirus or Muscovy duck parvovirus and clinically showed typical fibrinous necrotic enteritis, diarrhea, stunting, loss of feather and short beak. The mortality of goslings and ducklings under 5-week-old might be as high as 45 - 100%. Therefore, it is proposed to vaccinate healthy breed geese and ducks to produce enough maternal antibodies against waterfowl parvovirus in goslings and ducklings. However, it’s often heard that goslings were vaccinated against waterfowl parvovirus and then showed adverse effects in the field. Therefore, the experiment simulated the field condition to vaccinate goslings against waterfowl parvovirus and to challenge with wild parvovirus in order to compare the difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups. The results showed that the weight gain and uniformity of the vaccinated group was poor than that of the unvaccinated group. Moreover, after challenge with wild parvovirus, the death rate and mortality of the vaccinated/ challenged group were higher than those of the unvaccinated/challenged group. In addition, the weight gain and uniformity of the vaccinated/challenges group were poor than that of the unvaccinated/challenged group. According to the results, it is not proper to vaccinate against waterfowl parvovirus in goslings. The method to prevent the waterfowl parvovirus infection is to vaccinate healthy breed geese and ducks to produce enough maternal antibodies against waterfowl parvovirus in goslings and ducklings.

The International Basic Veterinary Epidemiology Training Course sponsored by USDA was held in Colorado State University during April 15-26, 2013. The course facilitators included Mo Salman from Colorado State University, Cristobal Zepeda from USDA and Ian Gardner from University of Prince Edward Island, Canada. There were 28 participants coming from 24 countries in Asia, Africa and South America. Course contents included the concept of veterinary epidemiology, surveillance and surveillance systems, disease control, diagnostic tests, epidemiology and economics, epidemiological studies, sampling, statistics in epidemiology, risk analysis and decision making, etc. After the course, I not only reorganized and sensitized my epidemiological concepts but also got lots of new knowledge. Meanwhile, I also realized that surveillance was the start of disease control. Diseases are not distributed randomly. Therefore, a successful surveillance system needs the participation together of data-collectors and decision-makers. In the future, it is necessary to learn more knowledge and experience in veterinary epidemiology.