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Seminar 773  

Seminar:  773  
1
Speaker(s)
Yang-Chang, Tu
title
Study on the Pathology of Important Infectious Diseases of Stray Dogs in Taiwan in 2008
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to establish disease data that can be used as references for animal shelter and care, as well as monitoring important infectious diseases. For this study, 96 stray dog cases were collected from 8 public animal shelters in western and eastern (or take out ‘western and eastern’) Taiwan in 2008. Pathological and molecular biological techniques were applied in the study which elicited the following results. Canine distemper virus (CDV) was detected in 35 cases by RT-PCR. Typical lesions and inclusion bodies caused by CDV could be observed in 6 out of 35 cases. In digestive systems, parasitic infestations were the most common findings, including dipylidiasis (35 cases), ascariasis (16 cases), and trichuriasis (7 cases). In cardiovascular systems, dirofilariasis was manifested in 24 cases with related blood vessel lesions. In respiratory systems, 27 cases of purulent bronchopneumonia was the pronounced disease (including 9 cases of CDV and 2 cases of adenovirus type 2 infections). In urino-reproductive systems, 16 cases of parasitic granuloma, 8 cases of chronic prostatitis and 6 cases of testicular atrophy degeneration were discovered. In cutaneous systems, parasitic infestations were the most common findings including those of ticks (21 cases), fleas (12 cases), lice (7 cases), demodex mites(4 cases) and sarcoptes scabei mites (4 cases). In hepato-splenic diseases, 6 cases of parasitic granuloma,one case of hepatic capillariasis and one case of hepatozoonosis were also manifested. Such a disease investigation on stray dogs in Taiwan shows that parasitic diseases are the most common form of disease as parasites are easily transmitted to one another in shelters. Furthermore, CDV is believed to be the most common cause of bronchopneumonia, as suggested by some previous research; however, CDV was rarely detected in the case of bronchopneumonia in this study. Thus, the causative agent of bronchopneumonia needs further investigation in the future. Finally, this study suggests that dirofilariasis seems to associate more with shelter dogs in central and southern Taiwan
2
Speaker(s)
Fan Lee
title
Comparison of One-step RT-PCR Kits for the Detection of Bluetongue Virus
Abstract
Bluetongue is a Culicoides-borne viral disease caused by the bluetongue virus (BTV). The virus can infect domestic and wild ruminants but causes clinical illness mainly in sheep. In cattle and goats, BTV infections are usually subclinical, whereas infection in pregnant cows during early gestation may result in cerebral malformation of the fetus. Bluetongue virus infection is prevalent among tropical, subtropical, and some temperate countries. The most notable epidemic recently would be the 1998-2008 epidemic in Europe. Many methods, including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), have been employed for detecting virus specific nucleic acid of bluetongue virus in clinical samples. With the advantages of convenience and reduced contamination, one-step RT-PCR is one of the best choices for viral nucleic acid detection. The aim of the present study is to compare the analytical sensitivity of seven commercially available one-step RT-PCR kits for detecting bluetongue virus RNA. Serial diluted viral RNA, extracted from the strain BTV2/KM/2003, was used as the template of the RT-PCRs. Test procedures for the seven kits, SuperScript III One-Step RT-PCR System Platinum Taq DNA polymerase (Invitrogen), SuperScript III One-Step RT-PCR System Platinum Taq High Fidelity (Invitrogen), One-Step RT-PCR Master Mix Kit (Novagen), AccessQuick RT-PCR System (Promega), QIAGEN OneStep RT-PCR Kit (QIAGEN), One-step RedTaq RT-PCR Kit (Sigma-Aldrich), and Fast-Run Hotstart RT-PCR Kit (Protech), were pre-optimized and their analytical sensitivity in detecting the viral RNA were tested. The results shows that the two SuperScript III kits and the QIAGEN kit demonstrated the best analytical sensitivity and that the difference between the analytical sensitivity of the kits could be up to a 1,000 fold or more . These resultssuggest that the selection and optimization of commercial RT-PCT kits is important for establishing a virus detection procedure.
3
Speaker(s)
Haw, Chiang
title
nvestigation of the magnetic bead labeled diagnostic reagent of Newcastle disease virus
Abstract
Current development and use of Newcastle disease diagnostic assays has been predominantly based on tests of viral antigens or their antibodies, which often result in variations in specificity and sensitivity due to the differences of specimens or components. This proposal seeks to address this issue by implementing two strategies: (1) to develop a Newcastle disease specific bead-linked magnetic diagnostic assay by immuno-magnetic bead methods; (2) to perform RT-PCR with primers specifically designed for Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV). The development of these assays is useful not only for detecting latent NDV, but also they are simpler methods to implement and more specific in nature. In this study, we cloned the full-length F, NH and F-NH fusion genes as the epitopes of NDV with prokaryotic expression vector. Preliminary results demonstrate the ability to observe NDV proliferation as well as the detection of free viral DNA fragments and in cloned vector inserts. Further studies will focus on fusion protein expression, purification and monoclonal antibody production.
4
Speaker(s)
CH Pan Yen-Ping Chen
title
Study of the breeding technique for chicken resistance to salmonellosis and the surveillance and control plan for salmonellosis in poultry farms in France
Abstract
As part of the project, “The establishment of a breeding technique for chicken resistance to salmonellosis and a surveillance and control plan for salmonellosis in poultry farms”, we visited the French Food Safety Agency (AFSSA), French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) and National Veterinary College of Nantes during October 18 to 28, 2008. During this visit, we learned about surveillance and outbreak control issues for salmonellosis in poultry farms, isolation and identification techniques for avian salmonella, as well as the immune response and gene expression of chickens in the salmonella carrier state, among several other related issues. France, in accordance with the European Union zoonosis guidelines as stated in Council Directive 92/117/EEC, monitors avian salmonella on poultry farms and with ISO 6579: 2002 and ISO 6579: 2002/ Amd.1:2007(E) identifies avian salmonella in the laboratory. France only applies surveillance on avian salmonella in layer farms as there is presently a low positive rate (1.5%) of salmonella in breeding farms. Apart from disease control, French experts also imparted their breeding technique to breed salmonellosis resistance in chicken, and shared the study of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in chicken resistant to salmonellosis. From this experience, we hope to launch a standard operation procedure for avian salmonella identification and to establish a national laboratory for this purpose (you need a national lab just for identifying one pathogen? There must be more to this national lab. Otherwise this is a joke. Please expound.). A successful implementation of this project will have crucial contributions to the government’s policy for poultry salmonellosis control. We also look forward to building a good working relationship with our counterparts in France.