Home
 /  Seminar  /  Seminar 796
Seminar 796  

Seminar:  796  
1
Speaker(s)
Tu, Yang-Chang
Topic
Report of International Course on Transboundary Animal Disease
Abstract
In order to implement the cooperation project between USA and Taiwan and to strengthen the diagnostic techniques on important animal infectious diseases, one researcher of Animal Health Research Institute (AHRI) was dispatched to attend the 10thinternational course on transboundary animal disease (TAD) hold in Plum Island from 23rd of October to 7th of November in 2010. Totally, 21 trainees from 16 countries around the world attended the training course. The course was arranged half day of lecture and half day of clinical manifestation observation and necropsy. During the course, instructors gave participants several lectures on TADs, including etiology, clinical signs, transmission, diagnosis, quarantine techniques, prevention and control measures, etc. The participant gave a brief presentation on animal epidemic situations and prevention actions of the country and practical training was carried out in a BSL-3 necropsy room. Animals infected by TADs including High Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), African Horse Sickness (AHS), African Swine Fever (ASF), Classic Swine Fever (CSF), Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP), Foot-and-mouth Disease (FMD), Heartwater, Newcastle Disease (ND), Sheep & Goat Pox, Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV), Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) were presented. The practical training reinforces trainees the cognition on TADs through signs observation, necropsies and sampling for diagnosis and is very instructed for preventing TADs invasion, early screening and starting up diseases control systems.
2
Speaker(s)
Chang, Jen-Chieh
Topic
Study on Rabies Diagnosis in Bats at Australia Animal Health Laboratory and develop the biosecurity and biodefence for breeding stock and poultry
Abstract
Rabies and lyssavirus infection in bats are important emerging zoonosis concerned.   Two AHRI researchers were supported to go to Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) from Nov 6 to Nov 21 for bat lyssavirus surveillance and diagnosis techniques by this project.  The training courses including: direct fluorescent antibody test, virus isolation, TaqMan PCR, immunohistochemistry stain, electron microscope, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test, and fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test.  Completion of this training greatly strengthens the diagnosis ability and surveillance technique for bat lyaasvirus in Taiwan and promotes the bilateral cooperation between Taiwan and Australia.
The technical platforms of biosecurity plans and standard operation procedures have been conducted and established for the breeding stock (pig production) and poultry (simulated native chicken). We expect to reduce the incidence of disease through detail recording on the animal status of the herd and accomplishing early warning system by owners.  The base line valuation technical platforms of the pig and chicken breeders were accomplished this year.  Twenty farms have submitted 1,389 samples for health surveillance on important diseases such as Classic Swine Fever (CSF), Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), Pseudorabies (PR), Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection, Japanese Encephalitis (JE), Porcine Teschovirus (PTV) infections and follow up tracing is then necessary.  The results revealed that incidence of PR and PCV2 infections in the farms were 25% and 45%, respectively and a follow-up tracing is then necessary.  The health surveillance on important diseases such as Avian Influenza (AI), Newcastle disease (ND), Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD), Infectious Bronchitis (IB), Reovirus infection (REO), avian mycoplasma infection (MG, MS), Pullorum Disease (PD), Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup J (ALV-J) showed that the viral nucleic acid of ALV-J and antibodies against PD were detected by the PCR and the plate agglutination assay, respectively. The farmers should pay more attention to the circulation of MG, MS, PD, ALV-J infections in the farms.  In recent years, we have been working on swine production medicine training. Finishing rate has been effectively increased by 15% in pig farms. We expect to implement biosecurity plan for more breeding stock and poultry farms year-by-year.
3
Speaker(s)
Chang, Chia-yi
Topic
21stInternational Pig Veterinary Society (IPVS) Congress / Analysis of antigenicity among various subgroups of E2 glycoprotein of CSFV
Abstract
International pig veterinary society (IPVS) is a prestigious international congress held every two years. The 21st IPVS congress, held in Vancouver, Canada, had included 263 oral presentations and 873 posters on the issues of pig health, production and management, food safety and animal welfare. The theme topics of this meeting were porcine circovirus diseases, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome and swine influenza. There was also a technical tour to the diagnostic labs and the level 3 microbiological facility of the Animal Health Center, British Columbia. My oral presentation was on the: Antigenic analysis among various subgroups of E2 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Our study displayed the differences in antigenicity of E2 between vaccine and field strains of CSFV by their variable reaction patterns between expressed proteins and monoclonal antibodies. The D/A domains of various CSFVs were relatively conserved, while the B/C domains were responsible for antigen specificity among various CSFVs, in which the disulfide bond and motif 771LLFD774 were essential for maintaining the structural integrity of its conformational recognition. Our study further demonstrated that residues 713E and 729D were critical for antigenic specificity of Taiwan field strain 94.4/IL/94/TWN, while residues 705D and 761K were specific for the LPC/AHRI vaccine strain.
4
Speaker(s)
Huang, Sue-Min                                         CoordinatorTu, Chien
Topic
Results analysis of inactivated grouper iridovirus vaccine in field trial
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to performed field trials for an inactivated iridovirus vaccine for grouper(Epinephelus coioides) and king grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus). We chose about 2.5-inch in sizes, health fish and immunized them with aninactivated vaccine against grouper iridovirus (GIV) by intraperitoneally route, and then boostered at 14 day post immunizaion. After immunized 3 and 6 months later, we captured the fishes from the field and evaluated the metabolic analysis and efficacy of the vaccine. In addition, we calculated the mortalities, injection safety, growth conditions and weight gains between the vaccinated and control groups. The preliminary results showed: a trial product was recommended to apply in the fish with body weight greater than 10 g the injection procedures,anesthesia and recovery conditions all need professional training and pre-assessments. The benefit analysis of clinical usage showed: in the king grouper farm, the survival rates was 100 both invaccinated and control groups, but the weight gain in vaccinated group was significantly (p0.001) greater than that in the control fish. Additionally, at 11 months post immunization, the survival rates in the vaccinated group and control group of the grouper farm were 74.6 and 50, respectively. Under laboratory condition, the vaccine efficacy wasdetermined as validated in both grouper and king grouper farms at 3 months post immunization. The efficacy was not evaluated at 6 months postimmunization because the control group fish survived in the highest-dose challenge(109TCID50/mL ). These results suggested that the inactivated vaccine against GIV was effective in the 2 field trial.