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Seminar 856  
Date:2015-12-09
Update:2016-03-24

 

Seminar:  856

1

Speaker(s)

Wei-Cheng Hsu

Topic

Canine distemper survey in wild carnivores in Taiwan: A report on the attendance of the “8th Asian Society of Conservation Medicine Meeting” in Myanmar

 

Abstract

Recently, infectious diseases in wild animals have been increasing as a result of  habitat alterations and a concomitant closer proximity with domestic animals. Canine distemper virus (CDV) has been reported in several species of wild carnivores and thus present a threat to wildlife conservation. To understand the prevalence of CDV infection amongst wild carnivores in Taiwan, we tested 273 wild carnivores specimens received in 2014 and 2015 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Eight specimens (2.9%) gave positive results for CDV. Of the eight positive specimens, seven were from the Formosan gem-faced civet (Paguma larvata taivana) and one from the Formosan ferret-badger (Melogale moschata subaurantiaca), with  6.9% and 0.7% testing positively among the queried specimens, respectively. Our survey thus revealed high canine distemper prevalence in the Formosan gem-faced civet population. To prevent the rise of a canine distemper epidemic amongst the wildlife of Taiwan, more attention is needed on wildlife conservation issues. This is the first wildlife canine distemper survey  covering 18 counties in Taiwan.

2

Speaker(s)

Chia-Yi Chang

Topic

Visiting and training in the reference laboratories for CSF in Germany

Abstract

Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most deadly diseases found in swine. CSF is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), a highly contagious and fatal disease and results in huge economic losses to pig farms worldwide. The Animal Health Research Institute (AHRI) plans on establishing reference laboratories for the OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) for the monitoring of several diseases, including CSF. In light of this preparation, Dr. Deng Ming-Chung and Dr. Chang Chia-Yi were dispatched to visit two reference laboratories specializing in CSF in Germany, the EU-OIE reference laboratory at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, and the national reference laboratory for CSF in the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), from September 5-17, 2015. During our visit to the EU and OIE reference laboratory for CSF, we practiced the diagnostic methods of cell culture, virus isolation and serological tests. Additionally, we tested the reverse transcription multiplex real-time PCR for the detection and genotyping of CSF developed by the AHRI. By visiting and training in two reference laboratories, we were able to gain more insight into the goals, as well as the day-to-day operations and protocols of these reference laboratories. International cooperation between these two reference laboratories and our institute is now under way and will invaluably contribute to the establishment of an OIE reference laboratory, here in Taiwan.

3

Speaker(s)

Ai-Ping Hsu

Topic

Use of Reverse Genetics Techniques for Development of Newcastle Disease Live Vaccine

Abstract

Newcastle Disease (ND) is a highly contagious avian disease and it causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry annually. Thus, the implementations of ND vaccines is necessary for every poultry farm worldwide. The Animal Health Research Institute (AHRI) has successfully developed a ND live vaccine of genotype VII based on serially artificial attenuation from a wild type virus. The intracerebral  pathogenicity evaluation of this vaccine strain on one-day old chicks revealed that the value of the ICPI index (Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index) is below 0.2. In order to develop an effective vector vaccine, a reverse genetics platform was successfully established at AHRI. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was also successfully constructed into this ND live vaccine vector using reverse genetics. For future study, GFP will be exchanged with antigenic fragments of IBV (Infectious Bronchitis Virus) for multivalent vaccine development.